Parkinson’s Disease

As each individual responds differently to Parkinson’s Disease, our specialised physiotherapists aim to individualise treatment.

Our Approach

Parkinson’s Disease is a progressive neurological condition, resulting from the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurones in the basal ganglia, deep in the lower region of the brain. The role of the basal ganglia is to orchestrate the performance of well-learnt, voluntary and semi-automatic motor skills and movement sequences. Dopamine also contributes to other processes, such as maintaining and switching focus of attention, problem solving and decision making.

At Montreal Neurotherapy, we offer a variety of services for treatment and rehabilitation of both the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease. We use a multi-disciplinary approach in the management of Parkinson’s.

parkinsons-gesturetek-physiotherapy

Physiotherapy

As each individual responds differently to the condition, our specialised physiotherapists aim to individualise treatment. Some of the physiotherapy treatments we offer can help to:

  • Reduce rigidity and improve posture through stretching and postural re-education
  • Increase speed and amplitude of movements through muscle strengthening and mobilisation exercises
  • Teach ‘cueing strategies’ which will help a great deal with the quaity of movement
  • Increase mobility through assessment of different mobility aids
  • Reduce muscle stiffness, spasms and pain

Occupational Therapy

Our specialist OT’s aim to improve areas of personal care, work or leisure that are becoming difficult. This can be achieved through:

  • Functional activities independently or in groups
  • Cognitive measures to assist with memory difficulties
  • Assessment of function in your own environment and establish any needs for equipment, adaptations, or further rehabilitation
  • Hand therapy including splinting and exercise programmes
  • Assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits
  • Strategies to improve problem-solving abilities and memory
  • Handwriting techniques and adaptive equipment
parkinsons-occupational-therapy
parkinsons-occupational-therapy

Occupational Therapy

Our specialist OT’s aim to improve areas of personal care, work or leisure that are becoming difficult. This can be achieved through:

  • Functional activities independently or in groups
  • Cognitive measures to assist with memory difficulties
  • Assessment of function in your own environment and establish any needs for equipment, adaptations, or further rehabilitation
  • Hand therapy including splinting and exercise programmes
  • Assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits
  • Strategies to improve problem-solving abilities and memory
  • Handwriting techniques and adaptive equipment
rtms-therapy

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)

We are Treating Parkinson’s disease patients with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on both sides of the brain’s motor cortex improves bradykinesia (slow movement) and rigidity. Stimulation of the motor area can help Parkinson’s symptoms, and this can be sustained over time.

rTMS is a procedure in which cerebral electrical activity is influenced by a pulsed magnetic field. The magnetic field is generated by passing brief current pulses through a figure 8 coil. This coil is encased in plastic and is held close to the scalp so that the magnetic field can be focused onto specific areas of the cortex, or surface, of the brain — it is a safe and efficient procedure.

rTMS therapy is approved by Health Canada & the FDA (USA) and by the RAMQ. Our approach is safe, efficient with lasting effects.

The importance of Nutrition

Science shows us that food is not just energy or calories but information that regulates almost every function of our body. Food is connected to all diseases, including brain disorders. The enteric nervous system contains approximately 100 million neurons, more than either the spinal cord or entire peripheral nervous system. The digestive system has it’s own set of reflexes and acts autonomically, without conscious control of the central nervous system. The Vagus nerve, one of the cranial nerves and the longest nerve of the autonomic nervous system in the human body, carries information from the gut to the brain, and not the other way around. The gut sends signals to the brain, and this can affect our mood and mental wellness.

At The Montreal Neurotherapy Center, we have outlined some simple and effective strategies to improve your gut health, and therefore your physical and mental health. Our functional nutritionists can heal you maximise your recovery.

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.
– Hippocrates

See how the Montreal Neurotherapy
Center can help!